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Sports in Development, The Kids League

January 25, 2009

December 2008

One of the new and exciting organisations Artfully AWARE is promoting is The Kids League (TKL), a Uganda-based volunteer organisation. TKL enthusiastically promotes sporting skills and team spirit amongst children through fun and healthy activities.
We are in the midst of creating strong links between the Kids League and Brookfield Community School in Chesterfield, England, a Specialist Sports College, to create cultural bonds between children and young adults through sport and the arts. The shared hope is that this will lead to more events in the future where arts and sport work hand in hand in childhood development.

Below, kindly written by TKL co-founder Ann Dudley, is an introduction to their work and a taste of the immense success they are achieving.

Kampala Kids League (KKL) was founded 10 Years ago to ‘Provide Healthy Fun for Boys and Girls’ in Kampala.

From its first season to this season, the 57th of its kind, KKL has proved a resounding success and lived up to its promise to over 12,000 kids in and around Kampala.
Its inclusive message has challenged the behavior and attitudes of people in the Ugandan capital of Kampala with its volunteer requirement of parents and guardians to fulfill a role in running or administering the operation of the leagues, thus encouraging them to spend quality time with their children as young people interact with teammates who come from all walks of life.

From this wonderful opportunity to talent spot came the KKL Euro team, an elite selected side which has travelled from Uganda to Europe for the last 7 years and has accumulated 17 International trophies. Out of the experience of KKL, and a desire to spread the health and education messages of sports in development, the Kids League (TKL) was formed in 2004 as an International NGO based in Uganda.

Programmes have since been established in some 14 Districts of Uganda, including programmes operating in Gulu and Karamoja. Through these programmes, over 35,000 young people have been exposed to its ‘Sport Plus’ methodology.
kkl-photo
The Kids League has continued with its ideology of breaking down barriers between communities, an ideology that was  the essence of its work with child soldiers in Uganda’s former northern conflict zone.

After making a recognizable contribution at the local and national level, the Kids League is striving to make a valuable contribution in the field of sports research internationally. TKL is one of ten implementing partners in developing countries in UK Sport’s IDS/Comic Relief funded research into how sports can improve the lives of disadvantaged young people and their communities.

Since its humble amateur beginnings, KKL has been recognized internationally by the International Cricket Council which awarded it the ‘Best Junior Cricket Initiative in Africa’ in 2006, as has TKL, by the Commonwealth Secretariat which nominated KKL/TKL for the visit of His Royal Highness Prince Charles at the 2007 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Kampala. In 2003, the organization’s co-founder, Trevor Dudley, was made an Ashoka Fellow in the USA,  and was awarded an MBE in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours in 2007 for ‘Services to Children’s Sport, Health & Education in Uganda’.

For more information on the The Kids League please visit their website, http://www.thekidsleague.org or email them at info@thekidsleague.org

Evonne Hill
School Education Director
Evonne works as a Special Needs Teaching Assistant in England
and runs one to one therapeutic art sessions with pupils.

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